Kentucky Derby

Are you the one who gave the horse his prowess
    and adorned him with a shimmering mane?
Did you create him to prance proudly
    and strike terror with his royal snorts?
He paws the ground fiercely, eager and spirited,
    then charges into the fray.

Montado Guterez Cruza la meta en el Derby dy Kentucky
Montado Guterez   – Cruza la meta en el Derby de Kentucky

He laughs at danger, fearless,
    doesn’t shy away from the sword.
The banging and clanging
    of quiver and lance don’t faze him.

Sarah Sis finishes the eighth race at Churchill Downs Saturday, May 7, 2016, in Louisville, Ky. (AP Photo/David J. Phillip)

He quivers with excitement, and at the trumpet blast
    races off at a gallop.

derby
    At the sound of the trumpet he neighs mightily,
    smelling the excitement of battle from a long way off,
    catching the rolling thunder of the war cries.

Derby2

Job 39:19-25



Lexington & Concord April 19, 1775

“But the whole meaning of history is in the proof that there have lived people before the present time whom it is important to meet.” -Eugen Rosenstock -Huessy

Paul Revere’s  Ride  

  Henry Wadsworth Longfellow

Listen my children and you shall hear
Of the midnight ride of Paul Revere,
On the eighteenth of April, in Seventy-five;
Hardly a man is now alive
Who remembers that famous day and year.

He said to his friend, “If the British march
By land or sea from the town to-night,
Hang a lantern aloft in the belfry arch
Of the North Church tower as a signal light,–

church

One if by land, and two if by sea;
And I on the opposite shore will be,
Ready to ride and spread the alarm
Through every Middlesex village and farm,
For the country folk to be up and to arm.”

Then he said “Good-night!” and with muffled oar
Silently rowed to the Charlestown shore,
Just as the moon rose over the bay,
Where swinging wide at her moorings lay
The Somerset, British man-of-war;
A phantom ship, with each mast and spar
Across the moon like a prison bar,
And a huge black hulk, that was magnified
By its own reflection in the tide.

somerset

Meanwhile, his friend through alley and street
Wanders and watches, with eager ears,
Till in the silence around him he hears
The muster of men at the barrack door,
The sound of arms, and the tramp of feet,
And the measured tread of the grenadiers,
Marching down to their boats on the shore.

marching2

Then he climbed the tower of the Old North Church,
By the wooden stairs, with stealthy tread,
To the belfry chamber overhead,

ladder
And startled the pigeons from their perch
On the sombre rafters, that round him made
Masses and moving shapes of shade,–
By the trembling ladder, steep and tall,
To the highest window in the wall,
Where he paused to listen and look down
A moment on the roofs of the town
And the moonlight flowing over all.

midnight-ride-1

Beneath, in the churchyard, lay the dead,
In their night encampment on the hill,
Wrapped in silence so deep and still
That he could hear, like a sentinel’s tread,
The watchful night-wind, as it went
Creeping along from tent to tent,
And seeming to whisper, “All is well!”
A moment only he feels the spell
Of the place and the hour, and the secret dread
Of the lonely belfry and the dead;
For suddenly all his thoughts are bent
On a shadowy something far away,
Where the river widens to meet the bay,–
A line of black that bends and floats
On the rising tide like a bridge of boats.

boats at night

Meanwhile, impatient to mount and ride,
Booted and spurred, with a heavy stride
On the opposite shore walked Paul Revere.
Now he patted his horse’s side,
Now he gazed at the landscape far and near,
Then, impetuous, stamped the earth,
And turned and tightened his saddle girth;
But mostly he watched with eager search
The belfry tower of the Old North Church,
As it rose above the graves on the hill,
Lonely and spectral and sombre and still.
And lo! as he looks, on the belfry’s height
A glimmer, and then a gleam of light!
He springs to the saddle, the bridle he turns,
But lingers and gazes, till full on his sight
A second lamp in the belfry burns.

two-lanterns-in-the-belfry-of-the-old-north-church-signalling-paul-revere-ride-1775

A hurry of hoofs in a village street,
A shape in the moonlight, a bulk in the dark,
And beneath, from the pebbles, in passing, a spark
Struck out by a steed flying fearless and fleet;
That was all! And yet, through the gloom and the light,
The fate of a nation was riding that night;
And the spark struck out by that steed, in his flight,
Kindled the land into flame with its heat.

He has left the village and mounted the steep,
And beneath him, tranquil and broad and deep,
Is the Mystic, meeting the ocean tides;
And under the alders that skirt its edge,
Now soft on the sand, now loud on the ledge,
Is heard the tramp of his steed as he rides.

paul-revere-midnight-ride-763x1024

It was twelve by the village clock
When he crossed the bridge into Medford town.
He heard the crowing of the cock,
And the barking of the farmer’s dog,
And felt the damp of the river fog,
That rises after the sun goes down.

It was one by the village clock,
When he galloped into Lexington.
He saw the gilded weathercock
Swim in the moonlight as he passed,
And the meeting-house windows, black and bare,
Gaze at him with a spectral glare,
As if they already stood aghast
At the bloody work they would look upon.

It was two by the village clock,
When he came to the bridge in Concord town.
He heard the bleating of the flock,
And the twitter of birds among the trees,
And felt the breath of the morning breeze
Blowing over the meadow brown.
And one was safe and asleep in his bed
Who at the bridge would be first to fall,
Who that day would be lying dead,
Pierced by a British musket ball.

bridge

You know the rest. In the books you have read
How the British Regulars fired and fled,—
How the farmers gave them ball for ball,
From behind each fence and farmyard wall,
Chasing the redcoats down the lane,
Then crossing the fields to emerge again
Under the trees at the turn of the road,
And only pausing to fire and load.

lexington

So through the night rode Paul Revere;
And so through the night went his cry of alarm
To every Middlesex village and farm,—
A cry of defiance, and not of fear,
A voice in the darkness, a knock at the door,
And a word that shall echo for evermore!
For, borne on the night-wind of the Past,
Through all our history, to the last,
In the hour of darkness and peril and need,
The people will waken and listen to hear
The hurrying hoof-beats of that steed,
And the midnight message of Paul Revere.

The Shot Heard Around the World



Christ The Redeemer



Lord, make me an instrument of thy peace.

Where there is hatred, let me sow love;

Where there is injury, pardon;

Where there is doubt, faith;

Where there is despair, hope;

Where there is darkness, light;

Where there is sadness, joy. 

O divine Master, grant that I may not so much seek

To be consoled as to console,

To be understood as to understand,

To be loved as to love;

For it is in giving that we receive;

It is in pardoning that we are pardoned;

It is in dying to self that we are born to eternal life.

-St. Francis

sunrise

“Forgive , daily, those who caused the wounds that keep you from wholeness.  Increasingly, I find God uses our wounds in His service.  By harboring blame for those who casued them, I slow the act of redemption that can bring healing. ” – Phillip Yancey

forgiveness-copy

 

Jesus said, “Father, forgive them, for they don’t know what they are doing.”



 

Sonnet 43: How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count The Ways

For Art

amy-al-white-petteway-the-long-shadow-of-a-couple-holding-hands-cast-on-a-dirt-road

Elizabeth Barrett Browning

 

How do I love thee? Let me count the ways.
I love thee to the depth and breadth and height
My soul can reach, when feeling out of sight
For the ends of Being and ideal Grace.
I love thee to the level of everyday’s
Most quiet need, by sun and candle-light.holding hands
I love thee freely, as men strive for Right;
I love thee purely, as they turn from Praise.
I love thee with the passion put to use
In my old griefs, and with my childhood’s faith.
I love thee with a love I seemed to lose
With my lost saints,—I love thee with the breath,
Smiles, tears, of all my life!—and, if God choose,
I shall but love thee better after death.

kiss



I Dream A World

 

I Dream A World

I dream a world where man

No other man will scorn,

Where love will bless the earth

And peace its paths adorn

I dream a world where all

Will know sweet freedom’s way,

Where greed no longer saps the soul

Nor avarice blights our day.

A world I dream where black or white,

Whatever race you be,

Will share the bounties of the earth

And every man is free,

Where wretchedness will hang its head

And joy, like a pearl,

Attends the needs of all mankind-

Of such I dream, my world!

                                                                                      – Langston Huges

peace



Advent

 

Cosmic Christ - Advent in Art 2010 small

Into The Darkest Hour

by Madeleine L’Engle

It was a time like this,

War & tumult of war,

a horror in the air.

Hungry yawned the abyss-

and yet there came the starMary McKibben Dana

baby Jesusand the child most wonderfully there.

It was time like this

of fear & lust for power,

Eddie Claz
Eddie Claz

license & greed and blight-

and yet the Prince of bliss

came into the darkest hour

in quiet & silent light.cold_fusion_by_hunduel-d7ur513

And in a time like this

how celebrate his birth

when all things fall apart?

Ah! Wonderful it is

with no room on the earth

the stable is our heart.advent in heart

 

 

 



 

November

 

Fall Song – by Mary Oliver

windwater stone 10

Another year gone, leaving everywhere

its rich spiced residues: vines, leaves,

the uneaten fruits crumbling damplyrotten-apples-sidewalk-fallen-tree-top-view-58302721

in the shadows, unmattering back

from the particular island

of this summer, this NOW, that now is nowhere

except underfoot, molderingnov acorns 2

in that black subterranean castle

of unobservable mysteries – roots and sealed seeds milkweed nov.

and the wanderings of water. This

I try to remember when time’s measure

painfully chafes, for instance when autumn

flares out at the last, boisterous and like us longingNov.

to stay – how everything lives, shifting

from one bright vision to another, forever

in these momentary pastures. 

transcarpathian-pastures-autumn-near-beautiful-mountain-peaks-live-huts-hutsul-shepherds-ukraine-herding-sheep-summer-48294041

 

 

 



 

Wind, Water, Stone

wind water stone 11

Wind, Water, Stone

BY OCTAVIO PAZ

TRANSLATED BY ELIOT WEINBERGER

for Roger Caillois

Water hollows stone,windwater stone 4

wind scatters water,

stone stops the wind.

Water, wind, stone.

Wind carves stone,

windwater stone 5stone’s a cup of water,

water escapes and is wind.

Stone, wind, water.

Wind sings in its whirling,windwater stone 6

water murmurs going by,

unmoving stone keeps still.

Wind, water, stone.

Each is another and no other:

crossing and vanishing

through their empty names:

water, stone, wind.wind water stone 2



 

September

oo1940Wayne01

Eight-OH-Three

by Carol Diggory Shields                        

Lunch box, backpack.

Papers flying free.

Shoelaces untied —872462-001-child-wearing-shoes-with-laces-untied-close-gettyimages

Eight-oh-three.

Quick kiss, oops missed.

Bum! Out the door.

Jumping, jamming down the stairs —

Eight-oh-four.

Legs pumping, heart thumping,

Running down the drive.School-Kids-Running

Will I make it, Will I make it?

Eight -oh-five.

Tight corner, muddy puddle,corvallis-oregon-candid-childrens-photography_13-800x529

Dodge, jump, kick.

Slide into the bus stop —

Eight-oh-six.

Rumble grumble, grumble, rumble,

Up the road it chugs,

Faster than a speeding snail,

Slower than a slug.Yellow-Dinosaur-Sew-or-Iron-On-Patch-2-inch

A moaning-groaning, blinking-winking

Yellow dinosaur

Slowly hisses to a stop,

Opens up the door.

I have a simple question.

I’d really like to know —school-bus-kids

How come I have to run so fast

To catch a bus so slow?

school-bus-clip-art-1202969